1867 Georgia Street

1800 Block Georgia Street - detail from Goad's Atlas of the city of Vancouver - 1912 - Vol 1 - Plate 7 - Coal Harbour to Barclay Street and Cardero Street to Stanley Park

1800 Block Georgia Street – detail from Goad’s Atlas of the city of Vancouver – 1912 – Vol 1 – Plate 7 – Coal Harbour to Barclay Street and Cardero Street to Stanley Park.

 

1867 Georgia Street was on the north side of Georgia Street, between Denman Street and Gilford Street.

Legal description:  Lot 6, Block 64, District Lot 185, Group 1, New Westminster District, Plan Ninety-two 92.

 

1877, 1873,1875, 1869, 1871 and 1867 Georgia Street – detail from Goad’s Atlas of Vancouver, Volume 1; Plate 42 [Denman Street to Burrard Inlet to Chilco Street to Georgia Street]; Vancouver City Archives; Item : 1972-582.17; https://searcharchives.vancouver.ca/plate-42-denman-street-to-burrard-inlet-to-chilco-street-to-georgia-street.

 

From 1906 to 1936, this was the residence and business site of George Frederick Johnson (1864-1948).

In 1912 and 1913, Henry (“Harry”) Digby lived at the rear of 1867 Georgia Street.

In the 1940s, this property was the subject of a constitutional law case called Attorney-General of Canada v. Higbie. The case dealt with the ownership of the bed of Coal Harbour.

Further information appears on the page for George Frederick Johnson (1864-1948).

 

Sources

Constitutional Law Case: Attorney-General of Canada v. Higbie,

Attorney-General of Canada v. Higbie, [1945] SCR 385, [1945] 3 DLR 1 (Supreme Court of Canada), https://www.canlii.org/en/ca/scc/doc/1944/1944canlii29/1944canlii29.html; reversing Attorney-General of Canada v. Higbie et al., 1944 CanLII 298; [1944] 2 DLR 425; [1944] 1 WWR 615 (British Columbia Court of Appeal), https://www.canlii.org/en/bc/bcca/doc/1944/1944canlii298/1944canlii298.html; which had reversed Attorney-General of Canada v. Higbie et al., 1941 CanLII 276; [1942] 3 DLR 66 (British Columbia Supreme Court), https://www.canlii.org/en/bc/bcsc/doc/1941/1941canlii276/1941canlii276.html.

Service Ontario, Bulletin 75045, Interministerial Transfers of Administration and Control, Bulletin information; Issue Date: June 10, 1975; Legislation: The Crown Agency Act, R.S.O. 1970, c. 100; https://www.ontario.ca/land-registration/75045-interministerial-transfers-administration-and-control. “Administration and control is transferred to a Crown Agency, as defined in section 1 of The Crown Agency Ministry of Act, by order in council because it is not a separate legal entity from the Crown. A 1945 decision in the case of Attorney General of Canada v. Higbie et al established the principle that, because the Crown is one and indivisible, it is not appropriate for The Crown, when transferring land from one government to another, to do so by letters patent and should use an order in council.”